My Philosophy On Joinery

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Please read more about this in the website blog entry:
//ibuildit.ca/blog/my-philosophy-on-joinery/

More about this topic in this blog entry:
//ibuildit.ca/blog/making-money-woodworking/

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I Build It says:

Please read more about this in the website blog entry:

//ibuildit.ca/blog/my-philosophy-on-joinery/

You can help support the work I do in making these videos:

Project plans for sale: //ibuildit.ca/plans/

Support this channel on Patreon:

//www.patreon.com/user?u=865843&ty=h

My main channel:

//www.youtube.com/user/jpheisz

My home reno channel:

//www.youtube.com/c/IBuildItHome

My "Scrap bin" channel:

//www.youtube.com/c/IBuildItScrapBin

Website: //ibuildit.ca/

Facebook: //www.facebook.com/I-Build-It-258048014240900/

Instagram: //www.instagram.com/i_build_it.ca/

Stanton Taylor says:

I like pocket screws. Simple, fast and secure.

Rollack says:

Well here is my 2 cents, first let me say that i have been watching you, jay, and matthias for a long time now. There is always a easy and short way to make something, u just happen to take that route u make a lot of shop stuff, and of course u dont need fancy joinery to toss some screws in. But i dont think most people put them into most projects for strength, more so for looks. And well u use construction plywood for most everything. Jay likes to build a lot of furniture/ things made out of more expensive wood, and why not put fancy joints in those projects. Matthias one of my favs, loves the technical aspect of things and gets his joy out of that. At the end of the day build things that are fun to u and the way that best suits that. It is nice having different people to watch and there different approaches to everything, and that is what helps in creativity and for u guys i guess in some sense a bit of competitiveness which is always good. I know opinions are like assholes, but if u like what u are doing just do it.

All The Hobbies says:

Nonsense. If its worth doing its worth overdoing. If its not over engineered and overbuilt it's CRAP! LOL

Tony Ozimek says:

you are 100% correct!!

ukulelefatman says:

I look at the things my great great grandfather made and I can see the pride in them. I try to do the same.

threeque says:

Who you talking to John? %99 of us feel the same way. Ignore the elite.

Scott L says:

Great point John

Rodger Rabbit says:

As always another excellent video. When companies make tools, they do so for the masses and therefore are not perfect for everyone. In understanding this, I can see why you have made it even better. The fact that the company took exception is their loss. Maybe they could have learned from what you did and incorporated it in later production models so that their customers would benefit. Enough for my rant, as always John, your common sense approach is something that we can all learn from, I know that I tend to overbuild and you video has given me some food for thought.

Lee says:

Well said. I do this all the time to fit the need at hand. I think a lot of joinery is more for looks.

Frank Nachtigall Toneheads GmbH says:

greetings to your focus master.

Ben Winchester says:

Matt Cremona hand cut dovetailed every drawer in his High Boy project…lord knows what he'd have to charge for all that time if it were a sale piece

chickenguru says:

I agree John. I believe some build a certain way cause they may feel like a hack if they don’t vs something that is appropriate for the task that’s needed. I myself and probably like most only have so much time and many things to get done.

Luke E says:

Being someone just starting my little workshop, this video came along at just the right time.

514shopguy says:

John,
Words of hard-earned wisdom!
It is one thing to over-build your own home or a good chair, but purpose built should be the norm. If a project is multi-purpose then build for the worst case scenario, otherwise building to do the job well is just perfect on so many levels.

The big question, that I often forget to ask myself is, ‘…do I want this to last 10, 20, or 200 years?’. Sort of puts perspective on the project.

Keep going just as you are!

Phillip Jones says:

Telling it like it is my admiration

Phillip Jones says:

They should ask you for your patent

Michael Jameson says:

I build it v woodgers pantorouter chalange I would pay to see that bring it on gentleman luv yu work cheers.

bknesheim says:

Just a quick question:
If Youtube drop a 120s add before your video, do you get more then if they drop a 6s video?

Mark Pikas says:

Almost all of my shop furniture is plywood held together with 18ga brads and glue. Some of it is 20years old now and most of it has seen some heavy use. Even things like my shop stands and tables are plywood held together like that at 90* angles making longer members like legs. I have a few cases where it was something heavier and might have gotten a full lumber frame and then it got screws and glue. Nothing has fallen apart or had to be repaired/reinforced in any way with one notable exception, the carcass of a shop filtration unit that has one joint pulling apart (I've yet to pull it apart and figure out why right now it has one joint that has about a 1/32" gap in it and I might just squeeze some glue in it and drive a couple of screws in it and leave it.

When I build important/nice things I'll usually use better "joinery," like when I built my daughter a doll bed that she insisted was "like real furniture" it got all dowel joints, but it also got stain covered in clear poly, a custom mattress, and sheets…

You build to serve the function of what you're building. Occasionally you might overbuild (either in quality or strength), but that would be to test/practice something for a future project. If you build everything to the best quality you can you'll never get to your real projects, unless you're one of those people that just builds shop projects and nothing else.

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