Pro Sanding Tips for Woodworking

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I’ve finished making the doors for the upper cabinets in my kitchen, and it’s time to sand them. And sanding is as important as the rest of the steps involved when making something from wood, if you want professional looking results.
Since I will be finishing these with clear water based polyurethane, I don’t have to be as careful as I would if these were going to be stained. Stain magnifies scratches and defects that generally don’t show with a clear finish, so extra time need to go into the sanding.

I used my Ultimate sanding block:
//ibuildit.ca/projects/ultimate-sanding-block/
And my flat sanding file:
//ibuildit.ca/projects/wood-shaping-files/
Along with my random orbit sander with a 220 grit disk to sand and level the faces of the doors.

Notice I’m sanding on something soft that won’t mark the wood. I have an old towel on a piece of foam rubber gym floor mat.
A router can be used to either chamfer or round over the edge, but again can result in tear out or burning. The safest route is to just sand it, starting with coarse grit paper and move up to a finer grit.

You can help support the work I do in making these videos:

Project plans for sale: //ibuildit.ca/plans/

Support this channel on Patreon:
//www.patreon.com/user?u=865843&ty=h

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//www.youtube.com/user/jpheisz

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//www.youtube.com/c/IBuildItHome

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Comments

I Build It says:

I've finished making the doors for the upper cabinets in my kitchen, and it's time to sand them. And sanding is as important as the rest of the steps involved when making something from wood, if you want professional looking results.
Since I will be finishing these with clear water based polyurethane, I don't have to be as careful as I would if these were going to be stained. Stain magnifies scratches and defects that generally don't show with a clear finish, so extra time need to go into the sanding.

I used my Ultimate sanding block:
//ibuildit.ca/projects/ultimate-sanding-block/
And my flat sanding file:
//ibuildit.ca/projects/wood-shaping-files/
Along with my random orbit sander with a 220 grit disk to sand and level the faces of the doors.

Notice I'm sanding on something soft that won't mark the wood. I have an old towel on a piece of foam rubber gym floor mat.
A router can be used to either chamfer or round over the edge, but again can result in tear out or burning. The safest route is to just sand it, starting with coarse grit paper and move up to a finer grit.

You can help support the work I do in making these videos:

Project plans for sale: //ibuildit.ca/plans/

Support this channel on Patreon:
//www.patreon.com/user?u=865843&ty=h

My main channel:
//www.youtube.com/user/jpheisz

My home reno channel:
//www.youtube.com/c/IBuildItHome

My "Scrap bin" channel:
//www.youtube.com/c/IBuildItScrapBin

#ibuildit

Website: //ibuildit.ca/
Facebook: //www.facebook.com/I-Build-It-258048014240900/
Instagram: //www.instagram.com/i_build_it.ca/

Gary Rogers says:

"I really like the natural look of wood", sounds very much like the reasoning "I" use to decide to stain or not stain ???? Thanks for the top tips !!

Efrain Carrillo says:

Thanks for the great tips John. I was wondering how much sanding would you use for a plywood surface that's going to be painted with acrylic latex paint?

Mike Faneros says:

Thanks for the tips! I'm going to make one of those sanding sticks… Do you think it's important to lightly wet the wood to raise the grain and sand one last time before finishing? If you spray polly or lacquer will it raise the grain and no longer be a smooth finish?

Paul Kolodner says:

I have 2 issues to bring up. 1. I read that some kinds of sandpaper don't get dull. The wear causes the grains of some minerals to break and remain sharp rather than get polished smooth. Does anybody have advice about this? 2. I also read that you should wet the wood to raise its grain before the final sanding, to get it super smooth. Any thoughts on that?

eaglecot says:

To really beat Matthias with this project you can't skip on the glossy whatever varnish that he puts on everything.

Jerry Stark says:

Nice looking cabinet door. Well done!

Art Wood Sculpture says:

Nice looing doors

Christian Fiebig says:

I can definitely confirm the โ€žgetting tired of a project when it comes to sandingโ€œ part. Unfortunately I like to use oil finishes, so good sanding is even more important. Usually I go 120, 180, 240 to 320 grid for that.

BronkBuilt says:

Thanks for the tip. I have noticed that I can get some swirls where I start my sanding. I'll practice starting the sand after the sander has been turned on but before it reaches full speed.

VITO APA says:

How long after making payment for your plans do I receive them.

JimmY says:

what most non woodworkers dont realise is that sanding is usually nothing to do with smoothness, and more removing machine marks and sanding marks

Mark Armstrong says:

Thanks for the tips very useful

steve walker says:

Very nice job and tips. Bravo.

timeighty5 says:

Can you recommend a good block plane?

I Enjoy Creating Videos says:

Great looking cabinet doors John! Thanks for sharing the sanding tips and the video with us.๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ‘JP

Average Joe says:

Great video, great advice John

Francois Fouchรฉ says:

Thanks, great tips!
You must be glad you installed your air filter with all the sanding work going on ?!

btdga says:

Most people don't change their sandpaper often enough. I build passage doors and use at least 3 discs per door in two grits. I sand across the rails first and then sand the stiles to minimize the cross grain sanding where the rails meet the stiles.

One thing I didn't notice in the video (maybe I missed it) is using a low angle light to inspect the surface. That will show blemishes you can't see with direct light.

When breaking the inside corners of the frames I use hand held cloth backed sandpaper cut in 2" x 3" pieces (off a 3" wide roll). Using small pieces like that makes it easier to avoid accidentally scratching the panel or the face of the frame. To break the outside corners I use a shop made version of FastCap's "fast break" which allows me to do both sides at once. It saves a lot of time in a production environment.

Duncan MacKenzie says:

Thanks for the video.

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